CEDD – Drogas y Derecho

Research

People Deprived of their Liberty for Drug Offenses

By CEDD | October 28, 2015

The new study by The Research Consortium on Drugs and the Law (CEDD) provides recent statistical information on those who are detained, prosecuted and incarcerated for drug offenses in Latin America.

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Drug Users and State Responses in Latin America

By CEDD | March 12, 2015

The Research Consortium on Drugs and the Law (Colectivo de Estudios Drogas y Derecho, CEDD) has published a new study that assesses state responses to illicitly-used drugs in eight countries in Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay.

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Proportionality and drug crimes

By CEDD | March 12, 2015

This volume brings together studies by the Collective Drug Studies and Law (CEDD) around the principle of proportionality and its application in the field of drug laws in various countries in Latin America.

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Systems Overload: Drug Laws and Prisons in Latin America

By CEDD | March 12, 2015

Depriving a person of his or her liberty is one of the most formidable powers of any state. The way in which states exercise this power, striking a balance between the duty to guarantee public safety and the obligation to respect fundamental human rights, is of the utmost importance. The operation of the justice system has repercussions for society as a whole.

 

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Other publications

By CEDD | March 12, 2015

The CEDD study periodically a topic related to illicit drugs and law. The products of this study document and explore the costs of the current policy, both for governments and for major sectors of Latin American society.

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The Human Cost of the Drug War

By CEDD | March 6, 2015

These videos feature people who have spent years in prison enduring harsh sentences that are disproportionate to the crimes they committed. The videos are part of a TNI/WOLA study investigating the prison systems of eight countries in Latin America. The people in the videos are featured because they represent the rarely revealed human side of the war on drugs. These personal stories illustrate the unjust impact of current drug laws.

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